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LOOSE LEAF TEA

Tea Forté offers the same high-quality blends from our silken infusers in loose-leaf form. Our exceptional tea experience begins with handcrafted, uncommon, limited-availability teas, cultivated in just the right place at just the right time. Unlike other loose leaf teas offered on the market, we travel thousands of miles to procure the finest whole leaves, many of which are seldom offered outside their country of origin. As a result, our loose leaf offerings are distinctive, expressive and memorable.Read More

What is loose leaf tea?

Loose leaf tea is precisely what it sounds like: tea that comes to the kitchen loose, without the confinement of a single-serving bag or infuser. Much like a bulk spice, grain, or salt you might bring home from your local market, loose leaf teas are meant to be measured by hand during the preparation process, which typically takes place with a pot and strainer, a metal or silicone infuser, or a tea press (i.e., a French press used for tea).

Types of loose leaf tea

Any of the usual tea varieties -- black, green, white, herbal, and oolong -- may come in loose-leaf form. Due to the lack of individual packaging, some loose leaf teas may be less expensive per ounce than their single-serve counterparts, which makes them an attractive option for tea lovers who enjoy indulging in many different types of teas and tisanes.

Whether it’s a simple black tea you’re after, a flavored green tea, a rare herbal blend, or a gourmet oolong, you’re likely to find it in loose leaf form if you know where to look. Tea Forte offers all teas from our silken infusers in loose leaf canisters, so luckily, you won’t have to look far.

How to prepare loose leaf tea

Loose-leaf teas follow the same temperature and timing instructions as their bagged or pyramid infuser counterparts. Measure out one teaspoon of loose leaf tea for each eight-ounce cup you wish to enjoy. You may choose to use a metal or silicone infuser (sometimes called a “tea ball”) to house the leaves and keep them from floating in the water as it steeps, or you may use a French press or a pot with a strainer. No matter the method, the goal is to keep the leaves contained. Once you’ve prepared your serving, it’s time to enjoy. Read our article, The Ultimate Guide to Loose Leaf Tea, for more info.

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